Preconception stress increases the risk of infertility
Preconception stress increases the risk of infertility

Preconception stress increases the risk of infertility

The role that stress plays in infertility remains controversial, largely because despite medical advances a large percentage of infertility remains unexplained .Basic science has elucidated the linkages between the hypothalamic–pituitary axis (HPA) and hypothalamic–pituitary gonadal axis such that it is now accepted that physical stressors can perturb women's menstrual cycles.

It seems prudent to consider stress as a potential factor among couples who have failed to get pregnant despite 6 months of targeted intercourse. While there is a dearth of information regarding effective stress reduction techniques among women of reproductive age who are trying to conceive but have not yet sought treatment from a reproductive endocrinologist, stress reduction modalities, such as yoga, meditation and mindfulness, that have been shown to be helpful in reducing stress in studies of other health outcomes, might be relevant for further consideration While one must be careful to avoid any potential ‘blame’, by pointing out that high levels of stress are clearly neither the only nor the most important factor predicting one's ability to get pregnant, the suggestion that a woman considers participating in an effort to reduce her stress level is certainly unlikely to cause harm.

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